Social and Emotional Learning

Mandy CHAN, Laure CHEN, Clive LEE (in alphabetical order)

 

Through social and emotional learning (SEL), students acquire and apply knowledge, skills, and attitudes to support personal development, achieve collective progress, stay connected and empathetic, and maintain good rapport with others (CASEL, 2020). The Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL) depicts five core SEL competencies to be cultivated among students: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision making. OECD (2021) recently published its first international survey on social and emotional skills. It provides information on students’ social and emotional skills in the participating cities and countries, and how these skills are related to individual, home, and school characteristics and the broader cultural and socio-economic contexts (OECD, 2021). A growing body of research evidence has shown that fostering SEL is beneficial for students and teachers across disciplines and school levels (Corcoran et al., 2018; Taylor et al., 2017).


SEL can serve as a pedagogical strategy, adapted to a broad range of learning areas from humanities to science. Given that human development occurs in multi-level ecological systems, SEL activities should be situated within broader social-historical contexts and be accessible to all learners. These activities include – but are not limited to – storytelling, journal writing, group discussion, interaction with animals, hands-on experiments, and self-reflection. The design of SEL should be aligned with different key learning stages.


Continual provisions of professional development and resources are necessary to better equip educators in enacting context-relevant pedagogical practices. Successful implementation and delivery of high-quality SEL for students requires school leaders to value its importance, formulate specific SEL policies, and provide adequate resources to build an SEL infrastructure.


Below are some relevant and timely school examples, internet resources and scholarly contributions that raise issues, considerations, and challenges as we aim to promote and cultivate SEL among students and teachers.


References


Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (2020). What is the CASEL framework?


Corcoran, R., Cheung, A. C. K., Kim, E., & Xie, C. (2018). Effective universal school-based social and emotional learning programs for improving academic achievement: A systematic review and meta-analysis of 50 years of research. Educational Research Review, 25, 56-72.


OECD (2021, September 7). Beyond academic learning: First results from the survey of social and emotional skills.


Taylor, R. D., Oberle, E., Durlak, J. A., & Weissberg, R. P. (2017). Promoting positive youth development through school‐based social and emotional learning interventions: A meta‐analysis of follow‐up effects. Child Development, 88(4), 1156-1171.


Social and Emotional Learning
 

Highly-Cited Academic Articles (Based on analysed results from Web of Science)


Collie, R. J., Shapka, J. D., & Perry, N. E. (2012). School climate and social-emotional learning: Predicting teacher stress, job satisfaction, and teaching efficacy. Journal of Educational Psychology, 104(4), 1189-1204.


Duckworth, A. L., & Yeager, D. S. (2015). Measurement matters: Assessing personal qualities other than cognitive ability for educational purposes. Educational Researcher, 44(4), 237-251.


Taylor, R. D., Oberle, E., Durlak, J. A., & Weissberg, R. P. (2017). Promoting positive youth development through school‐based social and emotional learning interventions: A meta‐analysis of follow‐up effects. Child Development, 88(4), 1156-1171.


Weissberg, R. P., Durlak, J. A., Domitrovich, C. E., & Gullotta, T. P. (2015). Social and emotional learning: Past, present, and future. In J. A. Durlak, C. E. Domitrovich, R. P. Weissberg, & T. P. Gullotta (Eds.), Handbook of Social and Emotional Learning: Research and Practice (pp. 3-19). The Guilford Press.

 

Articles Published in/about the Region


Bai, B., Shen, B., & Wang, J. (2021). Impacts of social and emotional learning (SEL) on English learning achievements in Hong Kong secondary schools. Language Teaching Research, 13621688211021.


Lam, L. T., & Wong, E. M. Y. (2017). Enhancing social-emotional well-being in young children through improving teachers’ social-emotional competence and curriculum design in Hong Kong. International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy, 11, 5.


Wang, Y., Yang, Z., Zhang, Y., Wang, F., Liu, T., & Xin, T. (2019). The effect of social-emotional competency on child development in western China. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, 1282.


Wu, G. K. Y., & Mok, M. M. C. (2017). Social and emotional learning and personal best goals in Hong Kong. In E. Frydenberg, A. J. Martin, & R. J. Collie (Eds.), Social and emotional learning in Australia and the Asia-Pacific: Perspectives, programs and approaches (pp.219-231). Springer Singapore.

 

School Examples


Stamford American School Hong Kong. (n.d.). Social-emotional program.


Wong, W. M. (2019, June 26). Emotion lessons for primary students: Incorporating social and emotional learning into school curriculum, learning mindfulness and emotion control. HK01. (Chinese only)

 

HKU Hub


HKU Faculty of Education - Centre for Advancement in Inclusive and Special Education. (n.d.). Quality Education Fund “No Play No Gain” kindergarten social emotional learning project.


Ngai, J. T. K., Yu, R. W. M., Chau, K. K. Y., & Wong, P. W. C. (2021). Effectiveness of a school-based programme of animal-assisted humane education in Hong Kong for the promotion of social and emotional learning: A quasi-experimental pilot study. PLOS ONE, 16(3), e0249033.

 

Internet Resources


Websites


Aguilar, C., & Bridges, C. (n.d.). A guide to the core SEL competencies [activities and strategies included]. Panorama.


Education Bureau. (n.d.). Social and emotional learning: Fostering children's whole-person development.


OECD (2021, September 7). Beyond academic learning: First results from the survey of social and emotional skills.


Sanders, E., Yeropoli, T., & Marino, T. (2019, May 7). Foster social-emotional learning through making. Digital Promise.


UNICEF China. (n.d.). Social and emotional learning – Resources. (Chinese only)


YouTube Videos

Children and Screens (2021, September 17). Establishing character in a digital world: Building grit, resilience, and socioemotional skills.

Digital Promise (2020, March 28). Building social emotional awareness in the classroom with the RULER approach.

Learning Policy Institute. (2019, November 8). Webinar: Integrating social, emotional, and academic learning: Lessons for educators and school leaders.

 

Extended Readings


Corcoran, R., Cheung, A. C. K., Kim, E., & Xie, C. (2018). Effective universal school-based social and emotional learning programs for improving academic achievement: A systematic review and meta-analysis of 50 years of research. Educational Research Review, 25, 56-72.


Durlak, J. A., Weissberg, R. P., Dymnicki, A. B., Taylor, R. D., & Schellinger, K. B. (2011). The impact of enhancing students’ social and emotional learning: A meta-analysis of school-based universal interventions. Child Development, 82(1), 405-432.


Denham, S. A., Bassett, H. H., Zinsser, K., & Wyatt, T. M. (2014). How preschoolers' social-emotional learning predicts their early school success: Developing theory-promoting, competency-based assessments. Infant and Child Development, 23(4), 426-454.


Williamson, B. (2021). Psychodata: Disassembling the psychological, economic, and statistical infrastructure of 'social-emotional learning'. Journal of Education Policy, 36(1), 129-154.


Zins, J. E., Bloodworth, M. R., Weissberg, R. P., & Walberg, H. J. (2007). The scientific base linking social and emotional learning to school success. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 17(2-3), 191-210.

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